Business Tech Ninjas

Tax Planning for Business Deals: What to Consider When Representing the Seller of an S Corporation

As a tax advisor, you will need to employ different strategies when you are representing a buyer vs. seller in the sale of a company, since what is advantageous for one is often disadvantageous for the other. On top of that, you will also need to consider how different entity types are treated from a …

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Tax Planning for Business Deals: What to Consider When Representing the Buyer

As a tax advisor, you will need to employ different strategies when you are representing a buyer vs. seller in the sale of a company. Buyers and sellers tend to have diametrically opposed preferences, since what is advantageous for one is often disadvantageous for the other from a tax perspective. In this article, we’ll zero …

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Representing the Buyer vs the Seller: Tax Planning for Business Deals

Tax planners need to employ different strategies depending on whether they’re representing the buyer or the seller in the sale of a company. Buyers and sellers have competing interests when it comes to tax advantages—what is good for the buyer is often bad for the seller and vice versa. For example, a buyer will likely …

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Tax Planning for a Business Sale: Factoring in Goodwill

The term “goodwill” might initially bring to mind donating items to charity or even Christmas carols. However, in the world of tax accounting, goodwill refers to intangible assets that increase a company’s value. This can include things like the company’s brand name, strong customer base, positive customer or employee relations, and proprietary technology. The goodwill …

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Partnership Tax Complications: Navigating Negative Capital Accounts and DROs

Starting with tax year 2020, the IRS is requiring partnerships to report their capital accounts using the tax basis method. Capital accounts show the equity in a partnership owned by each partner and often include initial contributions made by each partner, business profits and losses assigned to each partner, and distributions made to each partner. …

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Tax Basis Method for Partnerships: The Transactional Approach

At the end of 2020, the IRS announced important changes to their compliance rules for partnerships. Starting with tax year 2020, partnerships must report their capital accounts using the tax basis method. Capital accounts show the equity in a partnership owned by each partner, including items like initial contributions made by each partner, business profits …

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Understanding Partnership Capital Accounts

Beginning in tax year 2020, the IRS has updated its compliance rules for partnerships. Most partnerships will now be required to report their capital accounts. These accounts show the equity owned by each partner and typically include information like the initial contributions made by each partner, business profits and losses assigned to each partner, and …

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Calculating Adjusted Tax Basis in a Partnership or LLC: Understanding Inside vs. Outside Basis

Calculating adjusted tax basis in a partnership or LLC takes us into a complex area of tax law. Remember that the tax basis is equal to the purchase price of an asset minus any accumulated depreciation. This formula sounds simple enough, but a business’s entity type can introduce unique complications in determining the initial value …

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Tax Basis for Inherited or Gifted Property: Implications for S Corporations and Partnerships

In a previous blog, we discussed tax basis—the amount that a taxpayer has invested in business assets, which determines the gain or loss when the asset is sold. Remember that a taxpayer must have sufficient basis to deduct a business loss on their tax return. Another set of tax rules that can be overlooked is …

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Debt Recourse and Tax Deductions for Partnerships and S Corporations

In a previous blog, we discussed how a shareholder in an S corporation or a partner in a partnership needs sufficient tax basis to claim a business loss. Tax basis refers to the amount that a taxpayer has invested in business assets, calculated by taking the purchase price and subtracting any accumulated depreciation. If the …

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